Measles is a disease that is caused by a virus. The virus can very easily spread from person to person through the air. The virus can stay in the air for up to two hours after a sick person coughs or sneezes.

People who are sick with measles may start symptoms with a high fever, cough, runny nose, and red, watery eyes. Two or three days after symptoms start, a red, flat rash may appear at the sick person's hairline and spread down the rest of the body.

There have been no measles cases in Wisconsin residents since 2014.


Common Questions About Measles

Am I protected against measles?

Centers for Disease Control (CDC) considers you protected from measles if you have written documentation (records) showing at least one of the following:

  • You received two doses of measles-containing vaccine, and you are a(n) —
    • school-aged child (grades K-12)
    • adult who will be in a setting that poses a high risk for measles transmission, including students at post-high school education institutions, healthcare personnel, and international travelers.
  • You received one dose of measles-containing vaccine, and you are a(n) —
    • preschool-aged child
    • adult who will not be in a high-risk setting for measles transmission.
  • A laboratory confirmed that you had measles at some point in your life.
  • A laboratory confirmed that you are immune to measles.
  • You were born before 1957.

For international travelers, CDC considers you protected from measles if you have written documentation (records) showing at least one of the following:

  • You received one dose of measles-containing vaccine, and you are an infant aged 6–11 months
  • You received two doses of measles-containing vaccine, and you are a person 12 months or older
  • A laboratory confirmed that you had measles at some point in your life
  • A laboratory confirmed that you are immune to measles
  • You were born before 1957

Do I ever need a booster vaccine?

No. CDC considers people who received two doses of measles vaccine as children according to the U.S. vaccination schedule protected for life, and they do not ever need a booster dose

If you’re not sure whether you are fully vaccinated, talk with your doctor.

What should I do if I'm unsure whether I'm immune to measles?

If you’re unsure whether you’re immune to measles, you should first try to find your vaccination records or documentation of measles immunity. If you do not have written documentation of measles immunity, you should get vaccinated with measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine. Another option is to have a doctor test your blood to determine whether you’re immune, but this option will take two doctor’s visits. There is no harm in getting another dose of MMR vaccine if you may already be immune to measles (or mumps or rubella).

I think I have measles. What should I do?

Immediately call your doctor and let them know about your symptoms so that they can tell you what to do next. Your doctor can make special arrangements to evaluate you, if needed, without putting other patients and medical office staff at risk.


Measles Disease Information

What do you need to know about measles? (Available in English, Spanish, Hmong, and Somali)

Measles FAQ

Measles Disease Resources


Measles Immunization Information

Measles vaccination information - Information for parents about the measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine

MMR vaccine information statement - in multiple languages - explains the risks of measles diseaes and benefits of vaccination

Are you trying to find your child's immunization record?  The Wisconsin Immunization registry may be able to help.


Ntwav Qhia Txog Qoob Qhua Pias-Measles (PDF)

Hoja de Datos Sobre el Sarampión (PDF)

 


 

Measles is a Wisconsin Disease Surveillance Category I disease.

Report IMMEDIATELY by TELEPHONE to the patient's local  health department upon identification of a confirmed or suspected case.  Report Marathon County cases by calling the Marathon County Health Department at 715-261-1900.

 

 

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